Friday, September 23, 2005

Lovely Rita

9 comments:

spd rdr said...

I can't believe that I gave you guys such a set up and yet got no replies.

Here's your homework:
Name that tune.

Suggested Essay Topics
1. Discuss the role of sickness in the novel. Victor often seems to fall ill after traumatic events. Is this a means of escape, and, if so, is it effective? Is there another explanation for his recurring illness?
2. Do the monster’s eloquence and persuasiveness make it easier for the reader to sympathize with him? Why do you think most film versions of the story present the monster as mute or inarticulate?
3. Trace the similarities between Victor and the monster. Consider their respective relationships with nature, desires for family, and any other important parallels you find. Do Victor and the monster become more similar as the novel goes on? How does their relationship with each other develop?
4. Victor attributes his tragic fate to his relentless search for knowledge. Do you think that this is the true cause of his suffering? In what ways does the novel present knowledge as dangerous and destructive?
5. Examine the role of suspense and foreshadowing throughout the novel. Do you think these devices are effective, or does Victor’s blatant foreshadowing reveal too much? How does foreshadowing differ among the three main narrators (Walton, Victor, and the monster)?

That'll teach ya.

Cassandra said...

Sigh...

Question #2 answers itself.

portia said...

Double sigh. I thought you were going for Beauty and the Beast.

Well, I never the read the book so I can't offer much on the topic of foreshadowing, or even the novel's examination of the conflict of man and his creation but I dare say Mel Brooks is a helluva lot funnier than Mary Shelley, and Boris Karloff was one of the greatest monsters of all times, on and off the page.

Dr. Frankenstein: You know, I'm a rather brilliant surgeon. Perhaps I can help you with that hump.

Igor: What hump?

portia said...

That said, I'd forsake Mel and Boris to be a guest at the dinner party on that dark and stormy night.

spd rdr said...

But what does it have to do with the picture?

portia said...

Well now you've lost me.
What does what have to do with the picture?

I'd like to buy a clue.

P.S. Shouldn't we be talking about baseball?

spd rdr said...

Victor attributes his tragic fate to his relentless search for knowledge. Do you think that this is the true cause of his suffering? In what ways does the novel present knowledge as dangerous and destructive?

portia said...

That's my clue? THAT'S MY CLUE?
I want a refund:)

I see the profile of a beautiful woman--who may or may not be named Rita--leaning against a railing looking out to sea with a Porsche in the background that someone crashed into the railing behind her...which in all likelihood is the "true cause of [somebody's] suffering."

Does this have something to do with James Dean, and his silver Porsche Spyder? Am I even warm?

portia said...

That's it, nothing more to add? Tease.

May there be a shut out in your future...your very near future:)